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News Desk: Industry News

Post-Brexit priorities for low-income voters in deprived areas

09 October 2019   (0 Comments)
Posted by: Heather Ette
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Post-Brexit priorities for low-income voters in deprived areas

What do low-income voters, in parts of the country locked out of opportunity, want to see after Brexit: their hopes, fears and aspirations for their families and local economies?

 How can political parties tackle the injustice of poverty and unlock opportunities for people on low incomes?

Mike Hawking, Policy and Partnerships Manager, Joseph Rowntree Foundation will be presenting on the subject at Wednesday’s IEP AGM – book your FREE ticket here https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/institute-of-employability-professionals-annual-general-meeting-2019-registration-71501558085

 JRF has worked with UK in a Changing Europe and ComRes to amplify the views of people on low incomes so they gain more of a role in public and political debate.

What you need to know:

1.     The people they spoke to feel disillusioned and distrust politicians. Three years after the Brexit vote, they are frustrated at the lack of progress on the domestic issues that matter to them.

2.     People on low incomes are demanding change from political leaders after Brexit, regardless of their political preferences. They expect more spending on domestic priorities, want to see their areas receive their ‘fair share’ of investment from government and business, so they have the opportunity to thrive.

3.     An ambitious policy offer could deliver electoral dividends. People’s economic priorities were for more vibrant local economies and high streets; better paid and more secure work that boosts their living standards; and opportunities to improve their skills and find good apprenticeships.

View the briefing document here